in

Apple Harvest Time by Variety

Apples on branch1

Apples on branchThe apple is the most widely grown fruit. Apple trees grow everywhere except in the very hottest and very coldest regions of the world.

Apples vary from crisp to soft, from juicy to dry, from acid or insipid to bitter, bland, or aromatic.

Apples can range in color from green to gold to yellow to scarlet orange to pink to dark red to purple. All apples carry the remains of the apple blossom at the fruit’s end opposite the stalk.

The apple tree can be trained as a smart-looking espalier or grow twisted and distorted in an orchard. The leaves can be soft and downy or smooth but are never glossy or flashy like a pear. Apple blossoms can be pink- or red-tinged or simply snow white.

Some of the apple blossoms you see in spring will become fruit ready for picking in late summer or early fall.

If you haven’t got the room for an apple tree, you can train an apple on wires against a fence or even grown an apple as a column in a container. To begin growing apples, start with the one that you really like to eat. After that, explore apple flavors and branch out. There are nearly 10,000 different kinds, or varieties, of apples grown in the world.

Apple harvest time by variety

Apples come to market every season of the year. Add your favorites to this apple market calendar shortlist:

Fall. Delicious, McIntosh, Jonathan, Grimes Golden

Early Winter. Delicious, Jonathan, Cortland, Winesap, Rome Beauty, York Imperial, Golden Delicious, Stayman, Baldwin, Northern Spy

Late Winter and Spring. Winesap, Rome Beauty, Yellow Newtown, Delicious, Rhode Island Greening

Late Summer. Summer Pearmain, Anna, Gala, Gravenstein

Also of interest:

How to Plant, Grow, Prune, and Harvest Apples

Written by Stephen Albert

Stephen Albert is a horticulturist, master gardener, and certified nurseryman who has taught at the University of California for more than 25 years. He holds graduate degrees from the University of California and the University of Iowa. His books include Vegetable Garden Grower’s Guide, Vegetable Garden Almanac & Planner, Tomato Grower’s Answer Book, and Kitchen Garden Grower’s Guide. His Vegetable Garden Grower’s Masterclass is available online. Harvesttotable.com has more than 10 million visitors each year.

Comments

Comments are closed.
  1. The Maldives are not suited for apple production. Apples need a period of cold dormancy. Even some of the Israeli varieties like Anna, which require “only” 400 or so hours would have to be chemically sprayed to induce bud break… and I still wouldn’t bet on it. Grow your tropicals and take pleasure in them, just as I can’t grow oranges, and it would be futile for me to pine over them.

    • Determine which variety you want to grow, then check the number of chill hours required each winter by that variety. If there’s a match, the answer is yes. Check with your local government agricultural agency for suggested varieties for your location.

  2. I live in the Maldives. I am interested to know whether you got varieties apple suitable for our climate and soil.
    Our soil is calcareous sandy, pH 7 to 7.5, low in nitrogen and potash. We get rainfall eight month a year with 1500 mm. Temperature range from 25C to 33C. Its island situation close to sea and humid 75 to 80%.

    • Apple varieties that may be successful in your climate include Anna, Bramley, Dixie Red Delight, Fuji, Granny Smith, Sierra Beauty, and William’s Pride.

How To Grow Tips

How To Grow Tomatoes

How To Grow Peppers

How To Grow Broccoli

How To Grow Carrots

How To Grow Beans

How To Grow Corn

How To Grow Peas

How To Grow Lettuce

How To Grow Cucumbers

How To Grow Zucchini and Summer Squash

How To Grow Onions

How To Grow Potatoes

Soil 1

Soil: Making the Kitchen Garden

Flowering Arugula