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    Squash and Pumpkin Growing Tips

    Squash problems green squash

    Squash Planting and Growing Facts: • Squashes and pumpkins are members of the gourd family. Summer squashes and pumpkins originated in Mexico and Central America. Most winter squashes originated in or near the Andes in northern Argentina. • Summer squashes–zucchini, patty pans and cocozelles (Italian for vegetable marrows)–have whitish or yellow flesh. They are the […] More

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    Pepper Growing Tips

    Peppers–sweet and hot–are native to the tropics. They require much the same cultural treatment as tomatoes, except that peppers are perhaps a bit more tender. The easiest way to start peppers is to buy transplants at the garden center. If you start peppers from seed outdoors, sow seeds in pots in mid-spring for transplant in […] More

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    Hot Peppers for the Vegetable Garden

    Slice open a hot pepper and you will see tiny blisterlike sacs on the inner wall of the pepper. These sacs contain capsaicinoids or organic chemicals. Capsaicinoids make peppers hot. The more sacs you see on the inside of a pepper the hotter the pepper will be. When a pepper is cut or handled roughly […] More

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    How to Grow Hot Peppers

    Hot peppers are distinguished from sweet peppers simply by their pungency or hotness of flavor. There are thousands of hot pepper varieties in the world. (This is the case because peppers easily cross pollinate to produce new kinds.) The hotness of a pepper is determined by number of blisterlike sacs of capsaicinoids on the interior […] More

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    Late Season Tomato Checklist

    Late season tomatoes varieties reach ripeness or maturity 80 days or more after the seedling has been transplanted to the garden. Late season tomatoes generally bear the largest fruits and are commonly the tastiest tomatoes because they have been on the vine the longest and have ripened in the heat of summer. For the longest […] More

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    Early Season Tomato Checklist

    Early-season tomato varieties reach ripeness or maturity 70 days or less after the tomato seedling is transplanted into the garden. Early-season tomatoes are often smaller and firmer than mid- and late-season varieties which stay on the vine longer and are exposed to more hot weather. Early-season tomatoes are the best choice for regions where the […] More

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    Tomato Seed Saving

    Tomato seed from open pollinated varieties can be saved for planting next year. Open pollinated plants are allowed to pollinate each other in the open garden. Because tomatoes are self-pollinating plants (meaning male and female flower parts exist in the same flower), open-pollinated tomatoes are generally predictable and consistent (more below on hybrids and heirlooms). […] More

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    Tomato Seed Saving: Open-Pollinated Tomatoes

    Tomato seed from open-pollinated varieties can be saved for planting next year. Open-pollinated plants pollinate each other in the open garden. Because tomatoes are self-pollinating plants (meaning male and female flower parts exist on the same flower), open-pollinated tomatoes are generally predictable and consistent. Collect seed from any of these tomatoes for planting again next […] More