• Growing Herbs for Cooking

    Herbs in pots on bench

    Herbs for cooking are plants whose leaves, seeds, fruits, flowers, or other parts are used fresh or dried for flavoring food. (A spice–broadly speaking–denotes a flavoring derived from the seed, fruit, bark, or other parts of a plant grown in warm, tropical regions.) A “potherb” is a plant you cook in a pot. Herbs generally […] More

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  • Bees and Herbs

    Bee on oregano bud 1

    Many culinary herbs will attract bees to your garden. Grow herbs and you will get double-duty attracting pollinators and bringing flavorings to the kitchen. Many herbs can be harvested cut-and-come-again, leaves, flowers, and seeds. That means you can enjoy many of these herbs all season without replanting. Bees in the garden are a good thing. […] More

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  • How to Dry Herbs

    Herbs drying 1

    The herbs you grow and dry yourself will be far superior to those you buy packaged. Herbs with woody stems and thick or tough leaves are best for drying and holding their flavor—thyme, rosemary, oregano, sage, and lemon verbena are good choices. (Herbs with soft leaves and stems such as basil, dill, parsley, chervil, and […] More

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  • Lemon Herbs to Grow and Cook

    Lemon flavored herbs

    Lemony herbs—lemon flavored and scented—are easy to grow and add a tangy zest to many dishes. Fresh leaves are commonly torn and added directly to salads and main dishes as a seasoning or garnish. Leaves and some flowers can be steeped in teas or blended into oils and vinegars. All can be preserved for later […] More

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  • More Best Herbs for Container Growing

    Sage growing in pot

    Culinary herbs that grow well in containers include basil, chives, cilantro, dill, common fennel, garlic, lemon balm, mint, oregano and marjoram, parsley, rosemary, sage, French tarragon, and thyme. Herbs require well-drained soil, so use a good potting mix for container growing. (See the How to Grow instructions below for each herb.) Because culinary herbs are […] More

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  • Best Herbs for Container Growing

    Herb container garden

    Many useful culinary herbs grow well in containers. Basil, chives, cilantro, dill, common and Florence fennel, garlic, lemon balm, mint, oregano and marjoram, parsley, rosemary, sage, French tarragon, and thyme are excellent choices for container growing. Grow these culinary herbs in pots near the kitchen door or on a windowsill so they are readily at […] More

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  • Celery Cooking and Serving Tips

    Celery sliced

    Celery can be eaten raw or cooked. Celery brings texture and a mild flavor to salads, hors d’oeuvres, soups, stuffings, stews, and stock. It can be steamed, braised, or sautéed and served as a side dish. Celery tastes best when it comes to harvest in cool weather, late spring or in autumn. How to Choose […] More

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  • How to Plant, Grow, and Harvest Rosemary

    Rosemary 2

    You can learn how to grow rosemary in a few minutes. Rosemary is commonly used in the kitchen as a flavoring. The spicy, aromatic leaves can be used fresh or dried in many dishes flavoring beef, veal, pork, lamb, stuffings, soups, sauces, and salad dressings. Rosemary is a woody, evergreen perennial herb that can be […] More

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  • How to Plant, Grow, and Harvest Oregano

    Oregano leaves

    Oregano is a strong-flavored herb sometimes called wild marjoram (it is closely related to sweet marjoram). Oregano leaves are used fresh or dried to flavor many cooked foods including tomatoes, sauces, salad dressings, and marinades for grilled meats. The flavor of oregano is pungent, spicy, and sometimes bitter. Oregano is often used in Spanish and […] More

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  • How to Plant, Grow, and Harvest Pumpkins

    Pumpkin in garden

    Pumpkins are a warm-season annual that requires from 90 to 120 frost-free days to reach harvest. Grow pumpkins in the warmest, frost-free part of the year. Pumpkin Growing Quick Tips Sow pumpkins in the garden in spring when all danger of frost has passed and the soil temperature has reached 65°F (18°C) and night air […] More

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